Friday, 20 June 2014

Bee Kind

Recently I found a bumble bee trapped in a spider's web.  He was obviously fighting for his life and making a terrible noise as he struggled to free himself. Using great caution and a small twig, I managed to extricate the bumble bee who was exhausted from his struggles.  It was very distressing to see a lovely fat bumble bee in such a state and made me wonder if there were things I could do to make their lives a bit easier. 



I did a little research and spoke to some bee keeping friends who suggested I make a bee waterer.  It seems that dehydration is a big problem for bees. They can only drink from very shallow water, even a drink from a bird bath can result in drowning.  



All you need is a shallow dish, a few marbles, or in this case some beautiful stones I've collected from the beach.  Add fresh water but do not completely cover the stones.  The bees need a dry spot on which to stand as they get a drink. 



Remember to top up the water on very warm days as it will evaporate very quickly.  And if you find an exhausted bee and want to give it some extra TLC, here are some tips on how to make an energy drink to get him up and buzzing again!    Click Here for EMERGENCY BEE CARE

6 comments:

  1. Great advice... We have a beach area in our wildlife pond which our honey bees and other bees land on to take up water. I'm always rescuing bees, they need all the help we can give them :o)

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    1. I'd never thought of it before but it's only logical. We all need to drink more water in the warm days of summer. : )

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  2. Poor bee! But what a lovely idea to give them something to drink from. I didn't know that dehydration was a problem for them - you learn something new every day!

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    1. I didn't know you could revive a bee with sugar water... but NEVER honey water. I've learned something new too!

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  3. Il y a quelques cailloux qui mériteraient d'être polis à la machine.

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    1. All of these stones come from the beaches near our home in Devon. You can even find ammonites and other fossils along the seafront. It's called the Jurassic Coast.

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