Friday, 28 September 2012

Taking Tea in Olde England

I love living in Britain and I frequently say so, much to the irritation of the local people.  Their general response is, 'What do you like about it?'   I like the countryside.  I like the history.  I even like the weather.  That's the one that ruffles their feathers the most!  

One of the best things about living in Britain is the broad range of architecture spanning over the centuries.  It's not unusual to see 500 year old cottages for sale in the local newspaper.  While these old buildings may be protected by being 'listed', they are not preserved in aspic.   This building housing The Bridge Tea Room was built in 1502.  


Mol's Coffee House, in Exeter, was built in 1596, long before coffee was introduced to England. Legend has it that Sir Walter Raleigh and Sir Francis Drake used to meet there. Some say it was the first coffee shop in Britain.  Now it's a posh shop.  


Next door to Mol's is a lovely little tea shop of the same vintage.  Take tea here and you can look out the wavy old windows on to the Cathedral Green.  


Broadway House in Topsham houses the award winning Georgian Tea Rooms.   It has been said that staying in one of the rooms overnight is like 'being at an aunt's house'.   They are famous for their cream teas, complete with home made clotted cream and jam.  As you can see, Broadway House is the classic Georgian house.  



Bath is one of the most beautiful cities in the UK.  Sally Lunn's is the oldest house in Bath and home to the world famous Sally Lunn bun.  Tea is served by waitresses in proper black and white uniforms in the small, cosy rooms of the old house. It is a charming experience and the food is delicious. If you don't fancy a Sally Lunn bun for tea, you can visit the old kitchen in the basement and purchase one for later.  Be warned, they are addictive. 



For the full-on Regency experience, have tea in the Pump Room Restaurant near Bath Abbey.  You will be following in the footsteps of Jane Austen.  Tea in the Pump Room is a special treat, elegant and beautifully presented.  Sample the healing spring waters, if you dare!  

We could go on and on.  Thanks to the traditional afternoon tea, we have had the opportunity to study some fine examples of Tudor, Georgian and Regency architecture.  And they ask me why I love living in Britain!  



8 comments:

  1. I loved when my husband and I traveled to London a few years ago! Seeing pictures like this makes me want to go back and travel through all the little towns. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you should, Christina! There is nothing I like more than travelling through the British countryside and stopping in little villages for tea and cakes. There are so many beautiful places to see and the best experiences are usually unexpected and unscheduled. If you are brave, rent a car so you can really explore the hidden treasures of Britain. : ) It's a bit scary driving on 'the wrong side of the road' but SO worth it.

      Delete
  2. Lovely post. I've only been to the places you mention in Bath, but not the others.

    Yes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Bath is wonderful, don't you think? Wouldn't it be great if someone organized a tour of the UK based on tea rooms? Maybe it's been done and I just haven't heard about it. : )

      Delete
  3. Replies
    1. The 'Autumn' photo was taken by my hubby when we visited Westonbirt a few years ago. I am hoping to make a return trip this year and take some photos myself. I'll pass your kind compliment on to Andy. Thanks!

      Delete
  4. I can see why you love living in Britain. It sounds wonderful. I would have to try every tea room in the area. Scones, clotted cream, yum!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's a very good life and I enjoy every minute! I have to tell you, the one thing I miss are the brilliant Autumn leaves of New England. Your photos are lovely!

      Delete